Posts Tagged ‘safe fish to eat’

How do we make sure there’s enough fish for everyone to go around? A good way to start is by eating sustainable seafood. That’s right! Eating sustainable seafood can help manage and replenish our ocean with plenty of fish for future generations.

The essence of consuming sustainable seafood is:

  1. EAT small fish. NOT big ones.
  2. EAT wild fish. NOT farmed ones.
  3. EAT local fish. Only the healthy ones, NOT the 5 local contaminated fish.
  4. EAT farmed shellfish.

Now that you know the spirit of eating sustainable, watch this 1-minute video featuring Andy Sharpless, CEO of Oceana, to find out how you can help save the ocean by making intelligent choices when choosing to eat sustainable seafood for your next meal.

Are you a seafood foodie? At FCEC, we are all about seafood… the right kind of seafood!

What do we mean by the right kind of seafood? Safe, sustainable fish to eat! Seafood for the Future created an Inspired Choices culinary magazine featuring local healthy choices of fish, cooking tips and creative recipes from local chefs to expand your palates and knowledge of sustainable seafood!

For some, eating the right kind of seafood may seem like a daunting task, so they may completely remove seafood from their diet. That’s not the way to go. By consuming safe, sustainable seafood, you provide your body with many health benefits such as protein and vitamins. However, sometimes certain types of seafood can cause your body harm. That’s why it’s important to pick the right kind of seafood. If you love fishing or going on an adventure to catch your own meal, make sure you are aware of the local fishing advisory. FCEC recommends not consuming white croaker, black croaker, topsmelt, barred sand bass and barracuda caught off the Southern California coast due to contamination.

The art of choosing and cooking sustainable seafood is not only a mark of an ethical angler, but a responsible and healthy human being. So, select a safe, sustainable fish and a recipe from Inspired Choices and enjoy a Tropical Mahi Mahi with Mango-Pineapple Salsa, a Crispy Stripped Bass, or a Gently Spiced Trout BLT Appetizer to end the summer.

Have you tried any sustainable seafood recently? Share your favorite sustainable fish with us!

 

Last month, our Angler Outreach Team conducted their first fishing session. Fishing sessions are a new and interactive way for FCEC to provide outreach to local anglers on how to target safe fish to eat. By bringing the information to the piers and providing a hands-on learning experience, the Angler Outreach Team can directly make an impact on anglers’ behaviors.

“Fishing sessions are a really cool type of outreach. It’s different, and they [anglers] like learning about what type of fish they catch in this area,” reported an Angler Outreach Team member from Heal the Bay.

When fish are caught during the fishing sessions, they are placed into a glass tank for anglers and kids to see. The tank provides an up-close and personal way to help anglers properly identify fish species. Many children have enjoyed “touching the live fish during the fish identification,” portion of the session, and anglers have expressed that they “like having someone out on the pier showing them how to target different fish species that are healthy to eat,”  says an Angler Outreach Team member from Cabrillo Marine Aquarium.

The sessions provide both a fun and educational experience for all. Fishing sessions are fit for first time anglers, families and experienced anglers looking to refresh their fishing knowledge. Come join us at the next fishing session with our Angler Outreach Team to learn more about fishing and how to catch the safe fish to eat!

Stay tuned to our Facebook page and event calendar for upcoming fishing sessions. And while you’re waiting for the next fishing session to arrive, check out some of these actions shots from our latest fishing sessions:

Are you a master chef, busy mom, bachelor or a creative person that likes to play with new recipes in the kitchen? Or are you the kind of person who likes to keep it simple in the kitchen and grill outside on a sunny California day? Whichever you may be, we have a fun food-related contest just for you!

Join FCEC for our first Sustainable Seafood Recipe Contest with a chance to win a delicious meal at SlapFish, a famous sustainable seafood restaurant in Huntington Beach. This contest aims to celebrate healthy and sustainable seafood. New to sustainable seafood? We’ve got you covered! To see what classifies as sustainable seafood, check out the West Coast Guide of the Monterey Bay Aquarium’s Seafood Watch Guide. The guide recommends cleaner, greener, safer substitutes for popular, but often less sustainable and healthy, seafood items. Contestants are encouraged to submit their recipes using any of the fish selections recommended in the guide.

How to Enter:

1. Submit your favorite healthy and sustainable seafood recipe in the comment section below.

2. Recipes must include:

  • Title of dish
  • Type of sustainable seafood featured in the dish
  • List of ingredients
  • Simple directions to prepare the dish

3. Sustainable seafood recipes must be submitted by 11:59pm on November 16, 2012.

Want to step up your game? Cook the recipe, snap a photo of your healthy and sustainable seafood dish and upload the photo using the form below. Submitting a photo of your dish is optional and does not affect the judging for the contest.

Prize:

The top two recipes will each win a $60 gift certificate to Slapfish and will be cooked in the Slapfish kitchen to decide the winning recipe. The winning recipe will be selected by Slapfish owners Chef Andrew Gruel and Jethro Naude and will be announced on November 30, 2012. In addition to the $60 gift certificate to Slapfish, the winning recipe will also be featured on the Slapfish menu for 1 week , and during that week, the lucky winner will be able to eat their dish for FREE!

FCEC will create a photo album on our Facebook page to highlight the healthy and sustainable seafood dishes, so make sure to check it out.

On Your Mark, Get Set, Cook !

Thank you to chef Andrew Gruel of Slapfish for partnering with FCEC on this contest and for the generous prize donation.

If you would like to submit a photo of your dish, fill out your name, email and upload the photo below. To enter your recipe in the contest, enter the required elements in the Add New Comment box below.

Your Name

Your Email

Upload File

Can pregnant women and babies eat fish? Are there antibiotics in seafood? Are farmed or wild fish healthier to eat? FCEC, like those of you that are environmental and health conscious consumers, is also concerned with these important issues.

FCEC is pleased to share answers to these questions that recently appeared on HealthyChild’s blog. Their post addressed these very issues for readers and here’s some of the important information they shared.

How often is it okay to eat seafood?

It depends on your weight and what fish you eat. To check where you fall on the scale of how much fish consumption is safe, visit the Physician’s for Social Responsibility fact sheet or this chart put together by the Environmental Defense Fund which shows the type of fish that can be eaten safely by men, women and kids.

Are there antibiotics in fish?

The key is to know where your seafood is coming from. Fish from foreign countries is often not regulated in the same way it is in the United States. In general, according to Food and Water Watch, choose wild over farmed fish, unless it is farmed Rainbow Trout or farmed Oysters.

Is it okay for pregnant women to eat fish?

You have to be careful about the fish you choose to eat. While it is important to have a good source of omega-3 fatty acids for the overall well-being and development of babies, it is also crucial to avoid fish that are high in contamination. Monterey Bay Aquarium’s Seafood Watch lists a hand full of fish that are healthy to eat and high in omega-3s.

Can babies eat fish?

Once your child is 8 to 9 months of age, it is okay to feed them fish as long as you consult with your doctor first. Of course, if your doc gives you the green light, make sure the fish is boneless, cooked thoroughly and cut into small pieces. Also, as with any new foods for babies, you need to watch for any adverse side effects.

Check out the other great questions and answers about safe fish consumption by visiting the resourceful HealthyChild.org.

Photo is courtesy of DCFoodKing.info.