Posts Tagged ‘sustainable’

How do we make sure there’s enough fish for everyone to go around? A good way to start is by eating sustainable seafood. That’s right! Eating sustainable seafood can help manage and replenish our ocean with plenty of fish for future generations.

The essence of consuming sustainable seafood is:

  1. EAT small fish. NOT big ones.
  2. EAT wild fish. NOT farmed ones.
  3. EAT local fish. Only the healthy ones, NOT the 5 local contaminated fish.
  4. EAT farmed shellfish.

Now that you know the spirit of eating sustainable, watch this 1-minute video featuring Andy Sharpless, CEO of Oceana, to find out how you can help save the ocean by making intelligent choices when choosing to eat sustainable seafood for your next meal.

“For the past 50 years, we’ve been fishing the seas like we clear-cut forests. It’s hard to overstate the destruction. Ninety percent of large fish, the ones we love — the tunas, the halibuts, the salmons, swordfish — they’ve collapsed.” – Dan Barber

Watch this insightful Ted Talk by Dan Barber, a renowned New York chef and scholar, as he describes how he fell in love with fish and the sustainable recipe for the future of good food.

Is this healthy and self-renewing ecological network Dan describes possible? Wouldn’t you want all your food to come from these sustainable conditions? Share your thoughts with us in the comment section and join the conversation!

 

Are you a master chef, busy mom, bachelor or a creative person that likes to play with new recipes in the kitchen? Or are you the kind of person who likes to keep it simple in the kitchen and grill outside on a sunny California day? Whichever you may be, we have a fun food-related contest just for you!

Join FCEC for our first Sustainable Seafood Recipe Contest with a chance to win a delicious meal at SlapFish, a famous sustainable seafood restaurant in Huntington Beach. This contest aims to celebrate healthy and sustainable seafood. New to sustainable seafood? We’ve got you covered! To see what classifies as sustainable seafood, check out the West Coast Guide of the Monterey Bay Aquarium’s Seafood Watch Guide. The guide recommends cleaner, greener, safer substitutes for popular, but often less sustainable and healthy, seafood items. Contestants are encouraged to submit their recipes using any of the fish selections recommended in the guide.

How to Enter:

1. Submit your favorite healthy and sustainable seafood recipe in the comment section below.

2. Recipes must include:

  • Title of dish
  • Type of sustainable seafood featured in the dish
  • List of ingredients
  • Simple directions to prepare the dish

3. Sustainable seafood recipes must be submitted by 11:59pm on November 16, 2012.

Want to step up your game? Cook the recipe, snap a photo of your healthy and sustainable seafood dish and upload the photo using the form below. Submitting a photo of your dish is optional and does not affect the judging for the contest.

Prize:

The top two recipes will each win a $60 gift certificate to Slapfish and will be cooked in the Slapfish kitchen to decide the winning recipe. The winning recipe will be selected by Slapfish owners Chef Andrew Gruel and Jethro Naude and will be announced on November 30, 2012. In addition to the $60 gift certificate to Slapfish, the winning recipe will also be featured on the Slapfish menu for 1 week , and during that week, the lucky winner will be able to eat their dish for FREE!

FCEC will create a photo album on our Facebook page to highlight the healthy and sustainable seafood dishes, so make sure to check it out.

On Your Mark, Get Set, Cook !

Thank you to chef Andrew Gruel of Slapfish for partnering with FCEC on this contest and for the generous prize donation.

If you would like to submit a photo of your dish, fill out your name, email and upload the photo below. To enter your recipe in the contest, enter the required elements in the Add New Comment box below.

Your Name

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The best anglers fish responsibly—for their own health and for the environment’s. That’s why, when it comes to fish, any can be fun to catch, but not all are a good idea to keep. The danger is not because of recreational anglers. More often the biggest threats to individual fish species or the ocean’s ecosystem as a whole come from large scale commercial and industrial practices. Still, everyday anglers can make a big impact with small, but smart decisions.

Probably the best thing you can do as an angler to protect the ocean, and fishing, for yourself, your kids and beyond is to learn about which marine species are the most threatened. Some are valuable catches, such as the Atlantic Bluefin Tuna, that are in serious danger of extinction! So while you can’t always control what you catch, you can choose what to release. If you reel in an endangered species, take a picture then put the fish back in the water because, seriously, it will last longer.

The same caution should apply when going out to eat seafood. Even if you’re not catching the fish yourself, supporting sustainable seafood can help to ease the pressure on fish populations. Whether you’re placing an order, or doing the cooking, consider alternatives and substitutes that will give you the flavor you’re looking for tonight and ensure that it will be there tomorrow. Luckily for the West Coast, many of our local species from California to Alaska have stronger numbers than their Atlantic counterparts. That means less hard choices on the water and fresher options at the table.

But it’s also important to make choices for your own heath as well. Some seafood options may have strong populations in the wild, but they are exposed to toxics that they absorb from their environment. Large roaming predators like sharks can have extremely high levels of mercury built up from eating smaller species. Smaller fish can be highly impacted based on their surroundings. So, it’s always a great idea to know where your fish is caught and how it is prepared to minimize your exposure to harmful chemicals. You might not feel the effects right away, but consuming contaminated fish can lead to bigger health risks down the road.

There’s no denying the love anglers have for catching fish, and that we all have for eating them. That’s why it’s important to learn about which fish we should avoid, to protect both the fish and ourselves, to ensure delicious meals, to secure a fun hobby and to keep a healthy environment for generations to come.

 

*Photo courtesy of Rodale.